The brine, water flavored with salt, sugar, and other seasonings, gets injected into the meat, infusing it with flavor and juiciness while also helping to preserve it. Place the whole ham in a freezer bag. FoodData Central. A whole ham is the entire cured leg of pork, including the thigh bone, part of the pelvic or aitch bone, and sometimes a section of tailbone as well. To cook a bone-in ham, remove the skin from a defrosted ham, and preheat the oven to 300 °F. bone-in ham will take approximately 4.5 to 5 hours to cook. For serving ease, look for a spiral-sliced one. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Cook 10 to 14 lb. But the mild meat readily takes on the flavor of whatever glaze you use to dress it. A 12 lb. A traditional whole ham on the bone, just as it should be. Another option is a semi-boneless ham, which has had the aitch (hip) bone and tailbone removed, leaving only the thigh bone. Updated April 1, 2019. A baked ham lets someone with modest cooking skills serve a large and impressive piece of meat for a holiday gathering or dinner crowd. It really depends on what you're cooking it with. Halfway through cooking, remove the ham to add spices or a glaze, before returning it to the oven. This feeds up to 20 people. Instead of carving a ham by hand, you simply cut the meat perpendicular to the bone to have perfect, consistent slices. Should I add water or other liquid to the roasting pan with the ham? By using our site, you agree to our. The first step is to allow the ham to cool completely in the refrigerator. Learn more... Roasting a bone-in ham will impress guests on your next special occasion. Freezing food is easy. Peel the rind back. With a bone-in ham, first, decide whether you want a whole ham or a half ham. Ready-to-eat hams are available in both boneless and bone-in styles; a bone-in ham is superior in every way but one: ease of slicing. Most ham retains optimum quality in the freezer for only a month or two. Spiral-Sliced Boneless Ham With Spiced Apples, Pork, cured, ham, extra lean and regular, canned, roasted, Daily value on the new nutrition and supplement facts labels. Position the ham in a roasting rack, and place it in the oven. All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. Read our, The Spruce Eats uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience and for our. (0.45 kg). Nothing looks better on a dinner table than a hot glazed ham on the bone. Run the tip of the knife around the bone, on the underside of the ham. Updated May 5, 2020. From boneless to bone-in to spiral-sliced, the local grocery store carries a ham for any occasion. Cooking times will vary, but preparation is very similar. Cooked and ready for home carving. Ready-to-eat whole hams can be stored in the refrigerator for a week in the original packaging. Run your knife length-ways along the bone to remove slices. For more tips, including how to carve your ham, read on! The most popular glaze recipes often combine fruit juice, wine or whiskey, honey, mustard, brown sugar, fruit preserves, and spices. (4.5 to 6.4 kg) hams for 22 to 25 minutes per lb. The length of time you can safely store ham depends on the variety you purchase. Let the ham rest for 15 minutes before serving! Cut by a machine at the processing plant or a butcher, this technique slices a bone-in ham in one continuous spiral, leaving the meat on the bone in its original shape. wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. Increase the amount to ensure leftovers. Here’s what to do next: Use a paper towel to remove any excess moisture from the surface of the ham. A fresh uncured, uncooked ham lasts for three to five days in the refrigerator, as does a spiral-cut ham. Apply the glaze with a silicone basting brush or, for a thicker glaze, a heatproof spatula, then return the ham to the oven and let it continue to cook uncovered for the last 25 to 30 minutes (or the last 10 to 15 minutes for a spiral-sliced ham, to avoid drying it out). Pork, cured, ham, extra lean and regular, canned, roasted. Cook until the internal temperature of the ham reaches 130 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degrees Celsius). Heat a whole ham at 325 F for 10 to 15 minutes per pound, and increase ​the resting time to 20 minutes. With a bone-in ham, first, decide whether you want a whole ham or a half ham. Moreover, a ham bone is an exceptionally desirable piece of culinary swag. You can simmer it with black-eyed peas or collard greens (or both), use it to make ham stock or soup, or flavor slow-cooker jambalaya with it or use it for a one-pot meal like white beans and smoked ham shank. This article has been viewed 64,004 times. To create this article, 10 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. To create this article, 10 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. However, if you want to braise the ham, that's different. When it comes to preparing a ready-to-eat ham, remember that it's already been cooked. Unadorned, the slightly sweet/smoky flavor and soft texture of cured city ham tastes just like the sliced cold cuts found in the deli counter. For a whole ham, a low temperature of about 275 F for 12 to 15 minutes per pound should do it. You can use a clean piece of cardboard to guide the knife along the top like a ruler. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. % of people told us that this article helped them. A half ham that hasn't been pre-sliced needs to heat up at 325 F for about 10 to 15 minutes per pound, and rest for another 10 to 15 minutes before you carve it. The butt portion is leaner and more tender, while the shank portion is a little bit tougher and fattier, but a lot more flavorful. Ready-to-eat hams don't require much kitchen know-how, but you can customize this crowd-pleaser meal with a flavorful glaze. Fresh ham tastes similar to pork tenderloin, while dry-aged country ham is quite salty with a chewier, more dense texture. Cover the surface of the ham with pineapple slices for extra flavor. Christmas Ham on the Bone . If you're baking it in an oven, or you're slow cooking it, a simple broth will work just fine. You can buy a ready-to-eat ham at any grocery store, with a variety of choices. How to Freeze Cooked Bone-in Ham. Braising is the process by which meats are cooked in a savory liquid that provides a moist cooking environment. Get daily tips and expert advice to help you take your cooking skills to the next level. A whole ham is the entire cured leg of pork, including the thigh bone, part of the pelvic or aitch bone, and sometimes a section of tailbone as well. (0.22 kg) of ham for each person you plan to serve. (A bone-in ham will have less meat per pound than a boneless one.) Ham comes from the back leg of a pig. Cook a 1/2 lb. Vacuum-sealed packaging can increase the storage time of any ham variety, though. Semi-boneless hams come in whole or half (butt or shank). Wrap it in foil to trap as much moisture as possible. In many parts of the world, ham is salt-cured, sometimes smoked, sometimes salted and smoked, and occasionally salted, smoked, seasoned with a dry spice rub, and hung in a cool cellar to dry for a year or more, such as the famous Smithfield country hams from Virginia. Amaze with the Glaze A baked ham is perfectly delicious all by itself, but you can make it extra-special by adding a glaze. Should I add water or another liquid to the roasting pan with the ham? Leftover cooked ham should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator and eaten within three days. Cook a larger ham for 18 to 22 minutes per lb. Cook a bone-in ham slowly, basting or glazing regularly for rich moisture and flavor. 100% New Zealand Pig Care certified Pork. For more tips, including how to carve your ham, read on! In the United States, mass-produced supermarket hams—often called city hams—typically come brined and precooked. You just need to reheat it and should avoid overcooking it. US Department of Agriculture. Remove the ham from the oven when the internal temperature reaches 150 °F. You may be able to pick between a half-ham roast and a full-ham roast. This is a recipe for a dry roasting a bone-in ham and there is no need to add any sort of liquid. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. 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